Catalogue of Copyright Entries 1914
Catalog of Copyright Entries Library of Congress. Copyright Office 1970
Understanding Copyright Bethany Klein 2015-04-14 Digital technology has forever changed the way media is created, accessed, shared and regulated, raising serious questions about copyright for artists and fans, media companies and internet intermediaries, activists and governments. Taking a rounded view of the debates that have emerged over copyright in the digital age, this book: Looks across a broad range of industries including music, television and film to consider issues of media power and policy. Features engaging examples that have taken centre stage in the copyright debate, including high profile legal cases against Napster and The Pirate Bay, anti-piracy campaigns, the Creative Commons movement, and public protests against the expansion of copyright enforcement. Considers both the dominant voices, such as industry associations, and those who struggle to be heard, including ordinary media users, drawing on important studies into copyright from around the world. Offering media students and scholars a comprehensive overview of the contemporary issues surrounding intellectual property through the struggle over copyright, Understanding Copyright explores why disagreement is rife and how the policymaking process might accommodate a wider range of views.
The Origin of Copyright Wenwei Guan 2021-07-20 Contemporary copyright was born in a heroic era of human history when technologies facilitated idea dissemination through the book trade reaching out mass readership. This book provides insights on the copyright evolution and how proprietary individual expression’s copyright protection forms an integral part of our knowing in being, driven by the advances of technology through the proliferating trading frameworks. The book captures what is central in the process of copyright evolution which is an "onto-epistemological offset". It goes on to explain that copyright’s protection of knowing in originality’s delineation of expression and fair use/dealing’s legitimization of unauthorized use and being are not isolatable, but rather mutually implicated. While the classic strict determinism has been subject to an onto-epistemological challenge, the book looks at the proliferation of global trade and advent of information technology and how they show us the beauty and possibility of intra-dependence between copyright authorship, entrepreneurship, and readership, which calls for a fresh copyright onto-epistemology. Building on its onto-epistemological critiques on the stakeholder, force, and mechanism of copyright evolution, the book helps readers understand why, not only copyright, but also law in general, and justice too, need to be onto-epistemologically balanced, as this is categorically imperative for being, the fundamental law of nature.
Copyright's Excess Glynn Lunney 2018-03-31 Tests copyright's fundamental premise that more money will increase creative output using the US recording industry from 1962-2015.
The Copyright Book William S. Strong 2014-05-30 An accessible and comprehensive guide to copyright law, updated to include new developments in infringement, fair use, and the impact of digital technology.
Rethinking Copyright R. Deazley 2006 Rethinking Copyright is a small gem for an audience broader than copyright and intellectual property scholars, and well worth acquiring by a variety of general, corporate, law and academic libraries. Laurence Seidenberg, International Journal of Legal Information This excellent book raises again the controversial issue of whether we can learn anything and, if so, what from revisiting our past. Jeremy Phillips, ipkat.com All histories are about the present, not the past. Histories of copyright are no different: the pitched battles today over the nature of copyright frequently re-create a mythical past to shore up support for a partisan present. Deazley s Rethinking Copyright is a must have book for those who care about getting things right. Rethinking Copyright carefully reviews the critical formative years of statutory copyright (1710 1912), and then masterfully ties this foundational period to the current culture wars. It is a tour de force to be savored and returned to over and over again. William Patry, Senior Copyright Counsel, Google Inc., New York, US Two books in one, the first half of this manifesto offers a contrarian account of eighteenth and nineteenth-century English copyright history; the second contributes to the burgeoning rhetoric of the public domain in contemporary copyright scholarship. Deazley contends that, contrary to the common wisdom, common law copyright never existed in the eighteenth-century, but was a concerted creation of nineteenth-century treatise writers. He may not convince us that common law copyright was a myth, but he does compellingly demonstrate that, like the mythical giant Antaeus, whenever common law copyright seemed beaten down to the ground, it rose again with renewed force. He also persuades us that it may be a Herculean task to strangle the life out of the impulse, historical or otherwise, to believe that authors labors justify the contemporary default setting of the positive law in favor of proprietary rights. The second half, calling for reconceptualization of copyright as a derogation from the public s freedom to engage with works of authorship will surely provoke disagreement from many readers knowledgeable about copyright, but Deazley is an apt expositor of this increasingly popular trend in the legal academy. Jane C. Ginsburg, Columbia University School of Law, New York, US Copyright law remains hotly debated with the public domain contested territory. Ronan Deazley brings some welcome sanity to the discussion by revisiting the history of UK copyright law with a fresh eye and also by exploring the theoretical justifications for intellectual property in light of recent scholarship. The roles of rhetoric and legal writing in constructing copyright paradigms are the particular target of Deazley s critique. This is a provocative and challenging book which deserves a wide audience. Simon Stokes, Blake Lapthorn Tarlo Lyons and Bournemouth Law School, UK I have just finished reading Ronan Deazley s manuscript. It s a very enjoyable, readable book. As to content, I found it interesting, carefully researched, wide in scope, and thought-provoking even where I didn t agree with his conclusions. Catherine Seville, Newnham College, Cambridge, UK This book provides the reader with a critical insight into the history and theory of copyright within contemporary legal and cultural discourse. It exposes as myth the orthodox history of the development of copyright law in eighteenth-century Britain and explores the way in which that myth became entrenched throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. To this historical analysis are added two theoretical approaches to copyright not otherwise found in mainstream contemporary texts. Rethinking Copyright introduces the reader to copyright through the prism of the public domain before turning to the question as to how best to locate copyright within the parameters of traditional property discourse. Moreover, underpinning
Music and Copyright Lee Marshall 2013-09-05 "First Published in 2004, Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company."
Concepts of Music and Copyright Andreas Rahmatian 2015-10-30 Copyright specialists have often focused on the exploitation of copyright of music and on infringement, but not on the question of how copyright conceptualises music. This highly topical volume brings together specialists in music, musicology and copyright law, providing a genuinely interdisciplinary research approach. It compares and contrasts the concepts of copyright law with those of music and musical performance. Several tensions emerge between the ideas of music as a living art and of the musical work as a basis for copyright protection. The expert contributors discuss the notions of the musical work, performance, originality, authorship in music and in copyright, and co-ownership from the disciplinary perspectives of music, musicology and copyright law. The book also examines the role of the Musicians’ Union in the evolution of performers’ rights in UK copyright law, and, in an empirical study, the transaction costs theory for notice-and-takedown regimes in relation to songs uploaded on YouTube. This unique study offers an interdisciplinary perspective for academics, policymakers and legal practitioners seeking a state-of-the-art understanding of music and copyright law.
Art and Copyright Simon Stokes 2012-02-21 In recent years the intellectual property protection afforded to works of art has received increased attention from artists, museums, galleries, auction houses, publishers and their professional staff and legal advisers, as well as from those teaching or studying copyright and/or the law of cultural property. This was the first text to examine in detail the intellectual property rights protecting artistic works and artists' rights generally in the United Kingdom. First published in 2001, Art and Copyright has established itself as a leading text in the field. Now revised and updated, the second edition includes expanded coverage of Artist's Resale Right and the relationship between designs law and artistic works, as well as greater coverage of new media and art, and digital developments generally. It also includes additional precedent materials and checklists. It remains an invaluable work for all those involved in art law and for intellectual property lawyers involved with the exploitation and/or sale of artistic works, as well as for intellectual property academics, researchers, law students, curators, publishers, artists, gallery owners and all those interested in how the law protects artistic works.
Copyright Renewal Provisions United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks 1991
Book Republication Program [announcement]. United States Alien Property Custodian Office 1944
Copyright Robert A. Gorman 1999 In the last few years there has been an exponential growth in the attention paid to Copyright by the courts, Congress, owners of intellectual property & the public. The law of Copyright determines the extent of ownership rights in creative products such as those embodied in books, plays, theatrical & television films, recordings, computer software & other forms of expression. These creations of the mind have greatly increased in value in the United States & abroad, as the public seems to have an unlimited appetite for them. .
Drafting Copyright Exceptions Emily Hudson 2020-02-29 How should copyright exceptions be drafted? This is a question of ongoing concern in scholarly and law reform debates. In Drafting Copyright Exceptions, Emily Hudson assesses drafting options using insights from the standards and rules literature, and case studies from cultural institutions in Australia, Canada, the UK and the US. Drawing on thousands of hours of interviews conducted over fourteen years, the book describes how staff engage with and interpret the law. Whilst some practices are guided strongly by copyright doctrine, others are influenced by the factors such as ethical views, risk assessment, and prosaic matters related to collection management. This work should be read by anyone interested in a detailed account of interpretative practices related to the drafting of copyright exceptions, but it also speaks to broader debates about the relationship between the 'law in books' and the 'law in action'.
Copyright 1985
Discrimination, Copyright and Equality Paul Harpur 2017-04-03 This book explores how restrictive copyright laws deny access to information for the print disabled, despite equality laws protecting access. It contributes to disability rights scholarship and ideas of digital equality in analysis of domestic disability anti-discrimination, civil, human and constitutional rights, copyright and other reading equality measures.
What if we could reimagine copyright? Rebecca Giblin 2017-01-09 What if we could start with a blank slate, and write ourselves a brand new copyright system? What if we could design a law, from scratch, unconstrained by existing treaty obligations, business models and questions of political feasibility? Would we opt for radical overhaul, or would we keep our current fundamentals? Which parts of the system would we jettison? Which would we keep? In short, what might a copyright system designed to further the public interest in the current legal and sociological environment actually look like? Taking this thought experiment as their starting point, the leading international thinkers represented in this collection reconsider copyright’s fundamental questions: the subject matter that should be protected, the ideal scope and duration of those rights, and how it should be enforced. Tackling the biggest challenges affecting the current law, their essays provocatively explore how the law could better secure to creators the fruits of their labours, ensure better outcomes for the world’s more marginalised populations and solve orphan works. And while the result is a collection of impossible ideas, it also tells us much about what copyright could be – and what prescriptive treaty obligations currently force us to give up. The book shows that, reimagined, copyright could serve creators and the broader public far better than it currently does – and exposes intriguing new directions for achievable reform.
Copyright and Creativity Andreas Rahmatian 2011-10-01 A fresh, innovative, thought provoking look at the development of copyright law as it pertains to creativity and one that will give even the most experienced reader fresh insight into this tangled area of law. The author s language ability (German, English, French) and interdisciplinary background (law and music) combine to enable him to add significant analytical depth to the subject. A must read in a time when our creative industries are being called upon to help re-build our shattered economy. Charlotte Waelde, University of Exeter, UK Professor Rahmatian is perhaps uniquely placed to offer a complete rethinking of the nature and function of copyright. Working with original materials in original languages, he spans the continental and common law traditions in a breathtaking synthesis of the varied justifications and uses (or misuses) of the concept of creativity as property. Paul J. Heald, University of Georgia, US Copyright and Creativity discusses the making of property out of creative works through the legal mechanism of copyright. It shows the manner in which the law translates a great variety of expressions of the human mind into its normative system and transforms them into the property right of copyright or droit d auteur. This timely book examines the proprietary features of copyright, the inherent limitations of its powers, and its justification and relationship to the non-proprietary realm of the public domain. The final parts of the book deal with the propertisation/commodification of human authors themselves through their works as alienable objects of property, the well-known Romantic author critique as a sophisticated justification of that commodification, and at an international level, neo-feudal and neo-colonial developments as a result of this process. This detailed study will appeal to undergraduate and postgraduate students, legal sociologists, and specialists in copyright, property theory, or legal theory and political philosophy with particular interest in property theory. Practitioners within bodies involved in legal policy, organisations concerned with law reform, European institutions, and international organisations will also find much to interest them in this book.
International Copyright and Access to Knowledge Sara Bannerman 2016-02-19 The principle of Access to Knowledge (A2K) has become a common reference point for a diverse set of agendas that all hope to realize technological and human potential by making knowledge more accessible. This book is a history of international copyright focused on principles of A2K and their proponents. Whilst debate and discussion so far has covered the perspectives of major western countries, the author's fresh approach to the topic considers emerging countries and NGOs, who have fought for the principles of A2K that are now fundamental to the system. Written in a clear and accessible style, the book connects copyright history to current problems, issues and events.
International Copyright/communication Policies United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks 1984
The Copyright Wars Peter Baldwin 2016-05-17 Today's copyright wars can seem unprecedented. Sparked by the digital revolution that has made copyright—and its violation—a part of everyday life, fights over intellectual property have pitted creators, Hollywood, and governments against consumers, pirates, Silicon Valley, and open-access advocates. But while the digital generation can be forgiven for thinking the dispute between, for example, the publishing industry and Google is completely new, the copyright wars in fact stretch back three centuries—and their history is essential to understanding today’s battles. The Copyright Wars—the first major trans-Atlantic history of copyright from its origins to today—tells this important story. Peter Baldwin explains why the copyright wars have always been driven by a fundamental tension. Should copyright assure authors and rights holders lasting claims, much like conventional property rights, as in Continental Europe? Or should copyright be primarily concerned with giving consumers cheap and easy access to a shared culture, as in Britain and America? The Copyright Wars describes how the Continental approach triumphed, dramatically increasing the claims of rights holders. The book also tells the widely forgotten story of how America went from being a leading copyright opponent and pirate in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to become the world’s intellectual property policeman in the late twentieth. As it became a net cultural exporter and its content industries saw their advantage in the Continental ideology of strong authors’ rights, the United States reversed position on copyright, weakening its commitment to the ideal of universal enlightenment—a history that reveals that today’s open-access advocates are heirs of a venerable American tradition. Compelling and wide-ranging, The Copyright Wars is indispensable for understanding a crucial economic, cultural, and political conflict that has reignited in our own time.
Copyright Law in an Age of Limitations and Exceptions Ruth L. Okediji 2017-03-30 In this book, leading scholars analyze the important role played by copyright exceptions in economic and cultural productivity.
Copyright in the Music Industry Hayleigh Bosher 2021-02-26 This must-have book is a comprehensive yet accessible guide to copyright and related rights in the music industry, illustrated with relevant cases and real world examples. Key features include: • An engaging and approachable writing style • A practical orientation for those in the industry and their advisors • The impact of social media on copyright infringement, management and remedies • Accessible explanations of key concepts in copyright and related rights, as well as commonly misunderstood topics such as sampling and fair use.
General Revision of the Copyright Law, Hearings Held Before the Committee on Patents... United States. Congress. House. Patents Committee 1932
Copyright Questions and Answers for Information Professionals Laura N. Gasaway 2012-12-15 Copyright law is a critical issue for authors, librarians, publishers, and information vendors. It is also a complex area, with many shades of gray. Librarians continually need to seek answers to questions ranging from the reproduction of copyrighted works for library users, through the performance of audiovisual works, to the digitization and display of protected works on library websites. This book presents updated versions of the author's copyright columns published in Against the Grain, the leading journal in acquisitions librarianship since the late 1990s. It is the first volume in the series Charleston Insights in Library, Archival, and Information Sciences. The aim of the Charleston Insights series is to focus on important topics in library and information science, presenting the issues in a relatively jargon-free way that is accessible to all types of information professionals, including librarians, publishers, and vendors, and this goal shapes the pragmatic and accessible tone of the book. The volume is presented in question-and-answer format. The questions are real, submitted by librarians, educators, and other information professionals who have attended the author's copyright law workshops and presentations or submitted them to her by e-mail or telephone. The author has selected the questions and answers that have general applicability. She has then arranged them into logical chapters, each prefaced by a short introduction to the topic. Because it is written in an accessible and clear style, readers may want to review the entire work or they can just access particular chapters or even specific questions as they need them. The volume includes an index to facilitate reference use.
Privilege and Property Ronan Deazley 2010 What can and can't be copied is a matter of law, but also of aesthetics, culture, and economics. The act of copying, and the creation and transaction of rights relating to it, evokes fundamental notions of communication and censorship, of authorship and ownership - of privilege and property. This volume conceives a new history of copyright law that has its roots in a wide range of norms and practices. The essays reach back to the very material world of craftsmanship and mechanical inventions of Renaissance Italy where, in 1469, the German master printer Johannes of Speyer obtained a five-year exclusive privilege to print in Venice and its dominions. Along the intellectual journey that follows, we encounter John Milton who, in his 1644 Areopagitica speech 'For the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing', accuses the English parliament of having been deceived by the 'fraud of some old patentees and monopolizers in the trade of bookselling' (i.e. the London Stationers' Company). Later revisionary essays investigate the regulation of the printing press in the North American colonies as a provincial and somewhat crude version of European precedents, and how, in the revolutionary France of 1789, the subtle balance that the royal decrees had established between the interests of the author, the bookseller, and the public, was shattered by the abolition of the privilege system. Contributions also address the specific evolution of rights associated with the visual and performing arts. These essays provide essential reading for anybody interested in copyright, intellectual history and current public policy choices in intellectual property. The volume is a companion to the digital archive Primary Sources on Copyright (1450-1900), funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC): www.copyrighthistory.org.
Copyright Term, Film Labeling, and Film Preservation Legislation United States. Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on Courts and Intellectual Property 1996
Copyright Exhaustion Péter Mezei 2018-01-31 A comprehensive, comparative analysis of the European and US approaches to the exhaustion doctrine in the offline and online world.
Copyright for Archivists and Records Managers Tim Padfield 2015-07-28 As an archivist or records manager it is essential to keep up to date with the complexities of copyright legislation, and Copyright for Archivists and Records Managers will prove an invaluable tool in enabling you to do so. What is copyright? Who owns it and for how long? What rights does it confer, and what are the limitations and exceptions? This comprehensive manual uniquely outlines copyright law in the UK with special reference to materials relevant to archive and records collections such as maps, legal records, records of local authorities, records of churches and faiths, most notably unpublished works. It also offers advice on rights in the electronic environment and the problems associated with rights clearance; and covers related areas such as moral rights and rights in databases. The fifth edition of this respected work has been extensively revised and updated to include: a description of the major changes to copyright exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives including the changes to permit preservation copying and copying for users of any kind of work, a simplification of the declarations required from users and a new exception permitting onsite access to digital material a description and discussion of the new schemes for orphan works a description of the other changes to exceptions for copyright and performer’s rights, notably education; quotation; caricature, parody and pastiche; text and data mining; disability; and private copying a revision of the views expressed on the exhibition of literary, dramatic and musical works an explanation of why a digital photograph, consisting of a numerical file, is still an artistic work a description of the changes in duration for sound recordings and especially for sound recordings of performances and for copyright in songs analysis of new copyright legislation in the Channel Islands and other British overseas territories an explanation of how national courts decide whether they have jurisdiction over the infringement of copyright on the internet a description of changes to Crown copyright licensing and the licensing of public sector information a new section giving links to useful websites consideration of the many copyright cases that have come before the courts the last few years that have provided help with the interpretation of many aspects of the legislation. Some notable examples are on the meaning of ‘transient and incidental’, ‘scientific research’, ‘parody’ and ‘originality’; whether hyperlinking infringes; the importance of a signature on an assignment; the terms that may be implied into a licence; and the relationship between the rights of a copyright owner and freedom of speech. Readership: Archivists and records managers; LIS professionals in libraries, museums and galleries; students, researchers and genealogists.
The Object of Copyright Stina Teilmann-Lock 2015-07-24 Recent years have seen a number of pressing developments in copyright law: there has been an enormous increase in the range and type of work accorded protection; the concept of the ‘original work’ has entered into national copyright acts; and intangible entities are now entitled to protection by copyright. All these are consequences of legislative and technological developments that can be traced back over two centuries and more. the result. This book presents an interdisciplinary study of the growth of copyright law, largely based on archival research and on archival materials only recently made available online. The new history here articulated helps to explain why print is no longer today the sole or even the chief object of copyright protection. Taking its key examples from British, French and Danish copyright law, the book begins by exploring how the earliest copyright laws emerged out of the technological understanding of a printed ‘copy,’ and out of the philosophical notions of originals and copies, tangibles and intangibles. Dr Teilmann-Lockgoes on to examine the concept of the ‘work’ as it develops both conceptually and legally, as the object of protection, and then explains how, in a curious consequence, 'the work' turns the ‘copy’ into the 'mere' material instantiation of the intangible 'original'. The book concludes by addressing the considerable and complicated problems now emerging in copyright law following the inclusion of design within the scope of its protection. In this field Danish law, striving to protect Danish design, has been setting the trend for over a hundred years. In its examination of terminological exchanges between the diverse legal traditions and philosophical discourse, and in its thorough investigation of particular terms central to copyright legislation, this interdisciplinary book will be of great interest to scholars and students of copyright and intellectual property law; it also makes an important contribution to literary studies, legal history and cultural theory.
The Future of Copyright in the Age of Artificial Intelligence Gaon, Aviv H. 2021-09-07 The Future of Copyright in the Age of Artificial Intelligence offers an extensive analysis of intellectual property and authorship theories and explores the possible impact artificial intelligence (AI) might have on those theories. The author makes compelling arguments via the exploration of authorship, ownership and artificial intelligence.
Copyright and the Court of Justice of the European Union Eleonora Rosati 2019 This monograph focuses on the CJEU, and seeks to understand its role and action in the area of copyright, also outlining whether the latter has been informed by any particular vision of what EU copyright should be like, and what the legacy of all this might be.
Copyright and Collective Authorship Daniela Simone 2019-05-02 Addresses the difficult question of how to determine the authorship, and ownership, of copyright in highly collaborative works.
Non-Conventional Copyright Enrico Bonadio 2018-10-26 Copyright law constantly evolves to keep up with societal changes and technological advances. Contemporary forms of creativity can threaten the comfortable conceptions of copyright law as creative people continually find new ways of expressing themselves. In this context, Non-Conventional Copyright identifies possible new spaces for copyright protection. With current copyright law in mind, the contributions explore if the law should be more flexible as to whether new or unconventional forms of expression - including graffiti, tattoos, land art, conceptual art and bio art, engineered DNA, sport movements, jokes, magic tricks, DJ sets, 3D printing, works generated by artificial intelligence, perfume making, typefaces, or illegal and immoral works - deserve protection. Vitally, the contributors suggest that it may be time to challenge some of the basic tenets of copyright laws by embracing more flexible ways to identify protectable works and interpret the current requirements for protection. Additionally, some contributors cast doubts about whether copyright is the right instrument to address and regulate these forms of expression. Contemporary in topic, this thought-provoking book will be essential reading for intellectual property law scholars, practitioners and policymakers. Creative people and those involved in the creative industries will also find this book an engaging read.
Propertizing European Copyright Caterina Sganga 2018 With an acceleration in the last decades, the language of property, piracy and theft has become mainstream in copyright matters. Scholars have argued that this latent propertization has progressively led to the undue expansion of copyright and an enclosure of knowledge, causing clashes with users’ fundamental rights and EU social and cultural policies. Challenging the validity of such critiques, Propertizing European Copyright demonstrates that these distortive effects are only the result of mishandled property rhetoric and that a commitment to copyright propertization could enable a more internally consistent and balanced development of EU copyright law.
The Competence of the European Union in Copyright Lawmaking Ana Ramalho 2016-03-08 This book inquires into the competence of the EU to legislate in the field of copyright, and uses content analysis techniques to demonstrate the existence of a normative gap in copyright lawmaking. To address that gap, it proposes the creation of benchmarks of legislative activity, reasoning that EU secondary legislation, such as directives and regulations, should be based on higher sources of law. It investigates two such possible sources: the activity of the EU Court of Justice in the pre-legislative era and the EU treaties. From these sources, the author establishes concrete benchmarks of legislative activity, which she then tests by applying them to current EU copyright legislation. This provides examples of good and bad practices in copyright lawmaking and also shows how the benchmarks could be implemented in copyright legislation. Finally, the author offers some recommendations in this regard.
Law for Artists Blu Tirohl 2014-11-27 Written especially for professional artists and those studying the visual arts, Law for Artists is an accessible guide to those aspects of law that impact on artists and their work. It encompasses a comprehensive range of creative practices including fine art, photography, the graphic and plastic arts, animation, illustration, applied and media arts, as well as fashion, textile and product design. As one of the few academics working in this field Blu Tirohl clearly explains the legal principles - such as intellectual property, censorship, freedom of expression and criminal law - that are relevant to artists working in a range of disciplines. In order to illustrate these key concepts the book includes an engaging collection of examples of artists who have come into conflict with the law, demonstrating precisely the challenges faced by creative practitioners. The author also explores how the establishment co-opts transgressive artists; bringing about a range of contradictions that create legal inconsistencies. While the focus is primarily on UK law, the reader is also given ample information to understand how European law affects them. An entire chapter is also dedicated to the comparative study of US Law through well-known cases, ensuring students have a well-rounded knowledge of the concepts that they need to consider in a professional context. The book also provides additional resources including a list of useful websites, a glossary of key terms, as well as a list of statutes and cases. Law for Artists is an invaluable resource to professional practitioners and art graduates, as well as the academics who instruct them. This insightful publication, the first of its kind, helps introduce artists to the professional practice skills needed to ensure they are well-equipped to deal with working life.
Copyright Stephen M. McJohn 2006-01-01 The Examples & Explanations format is used for maximum effectiveness: clear textual overviews introduce each new concept carefully chosen examples demonstrate the applications and are followed by questions straightforward explanations answer the questions and provide additional follow-up
Balancing Copyright Law in the Digital Age Roberto Caso 2014-11-19 This book focuses on the thorny and highly topical issue of balancing copyright in the digital age. The idea for it sprang from the often heated debates among intellectual property scholars on the possibilities and the limits of copyright. Copyright law has been broadening its scope for decades now, and as a result it often clashes with other rights (frequently, fundamental rights), raising the question of which right prevails. The papers represent the product of intensive research by experts, who employ rigorous interpretative methodologies while keeping an eye on comparison and on the impacts of new technologies on law. The contributions concentrate on the "propertization" of copyright; on the principle of exhaustion of the distribution right; on the conflict between users' privacy and personal data needs; and on the balance between copyright and academic freedom. Starting from the difficulties inherently connected to the difficult task of balancing rights that respond to opposing interests, each essay analyzes techniques and arguments applied by institutional decision-makers in trying to solve this dilemma. Each author applies a specific methodology involving legal comparison, while taking into account the European framework for copyright and related rights. This work represents a unique piece of scholarship, in which a single issue is read through different lenses, demonstrating the need to reconcile copyright with other fundamental areas of law.
Copyright and Information Privacy Federica Giovanella 2017-12-29 Federica Giovanella examines the on-going conflict between copyright and informational privacy rights within the judicial system in this timely and intriguing book.

Copyright � 2019 trachomacoalition.org Inc.